All aboard! Onwards to structured authoring!

Our team of technical writers is embarking on a journey towards structured authoring. With 10 writers, we’ll move from an unstructured Word to PDF/CHM environment to a structured Flare to WebHelp/PDF environment. Or I should say “semi-structured”: We do have an information model based on DITA, but we won’t actually be able to enforce it with Flare (which we knew before we chose the tool).

It’ll be an interesting cruise, to be sure! Four writers already apply topic-based authoring rather than the previous free-form documentation guided mainly by common sense. The others have had training, but no real opportunity to write topics continuously. We have drafted tighter new processes to draft, write, review and edit topics to replace the previous loose processes of writing and reviewing, but they are not in place yet.

And then there’s the new tool, of course. Only one of us has worked with Flare before. Many of us are excited about getting Flare. Some really like it – what we’ve seen in several demos so far. Others just really loathe the current writing environment.

“Regarding the pain of others”

So as we’re about embark, I’ve been looking out for others who’ve taken the trip before. Scriptorium’s State of Structure webcast has been very helpful: Its results of a survey among 200 tech communicators helps to position us in relation to others who are currently implementing structured authoring or considering it. It also collects some mistakes respondents have gone through. I’ll just be quoting a few select points, but the whole webcast by Sarah O’Keefe is totally worth checking out, so thanks to Scriptorium for making this webcast available!

Reasons

The top reasons why survey respondents (consider to) move to structured authoring made us nod emphatically: Reuse, consistency and cost savings are also at the top of our wish list of achievements. Looking ahead, it’s promising that the majority of respondents achieve these goals.

We’ll also take other goals that respondents achieved, whether it’s to automate processes or to reduce content (oh, yes, please, we’re not even exactly sure how much redundant, almost identical content we have). So far we’re confident, we’re not only doing the right thing, but doing it for the right reasons, too!

Efforts

Savings have their own price, of course. Sarah’s survey confirms several cost points we’ve already identified in the project.

  • Converting legacy content is a biggie for us, simply because we currently have a lot of stuff.
  • Redefining output layout will take time, but will be worth it given what Flare is capable of doing with CSS in both web and print outputs.
  • Integrating a new system with its writing and publishing processes into our product and workflow systems will also take some time.

Mistakes

Mistakes have been made by others before us, and we’ll have plenty of chances to make our very own mistakes. If we’re lucky, we can avoid repeating the mistakes of others:

  • Planning and project management cause problems, maybe because most companies lack the experience of major documentation overhaul projects. Sarah specifically mentioned the lack of understanding of the project scope and of the need for testing. So we’ll look through our project plan again and ensure that the estimates are plausible.
  • Converting legacy contents can also get you into trouble, especially when you convert something that’s less than structured. It doesn’t help if you reserve too little time to do it or get inexperienced people to do, whether it’s off-shore labor or student helpers. That’s sound advice: GIGO (“garbage in, garbage out”) can certainly endanger the expected benefits. A new tool can help us be more efficient, but we still have to learn and apply structured writing in topics. So this confirms one of my two tech comm dogmas: Don’t get a new tool to fix your processes!

Setting out

What do you think? Is our crew well-equipped, given a tried and proven method, well-defined processes, a new tool and the words of warnings above? If you have additional advice, please leave a message.

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